Research Reveals the Importance of Nutrition for Fathers-to-Be

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PORTLAND, OR–(Marketwired – January 03, 2017) – While the importance of nutrition to a pregnant woman is widely known, the fathers’ choices receive far less attention. However, according to nutraceutical company Kirkman®, research is making it clear that environmental exposures and nutritional choices of a father-to-be can have profound effects on reproductive outcomes, from failure to conceive to birth defects.

Smoking and excessive drinking are likely the most common (and most commonly recognized) reproductive hazards and both can lead to reduced sperm counts.1 But there are other common exposures, including many encountered in workplaces, that can have detrimental effects on fertility.2

Millions of chemicals are commonly in commercial use. According to the CDC, more than 1,000 of these have reproductive effects on animals, but few have been studied in humans. Several of those that have been studied have been shown to lower sperm count and/or deform sperm shape (which can reduce the ability of the sperm to “swim” effectively).

Lead, for instance, has been linked to both of these negative outcomes. Exposure to other heavy metals has also been linked to negative effects on sperm production. Potentially damaging chemicals used in workplaces include bromides (used in dyes, disinfectants, and insecticides), styrene (used in plastic production) and tetrachloroethylene (used in dry cleaning).

Body weight has been linked to low sperm counts, both oligozoospermia, which simply means a lower-than-average count, and azoospermia, which indicates a sperm count so low that sperm is actually undetectable. For both underweight and overweight men, there is a slightly increased chance of azoospermia or oligozoospermia. Those deemed “morbidly obese,” however, have twice the odds of low sperm counts.3

Research on the impact of diet on male fertility is still at an early stage. Some studies have merely confirmed that generally nutritious diets lead to better outcomes, but others have narrowed their focus to look at specific nutrients. One found that vitamin E and selenium supplementation both increased motility and reduced the concentration of malformed sperm.4 Another found significant count and motility improvements following regular, high-dose intake of vitamin C.5 High doses of vitamin B-12 were found to increase sperm counts for both humans6 and rats.7

Moral of the story, limit your exposure, replace products and take care of you if you want future generations to be happy and healthy.

References:
  1. DeNoon, Daniel. Study: smoking degrades sperm protein needed for fertility, embryo survival. Accessed 12/27/16 from: http://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/news/20100910/smokers-sperm-less-fertile
  2. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. The effects of workplace hazards on male reproductive health. DHHS (NIOSH) Publication Number 96-132. Accessed 12/27/16 from: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/96-132/
  3. Sermondade, N. BMI in relation to sperm count: an updated systematic review and collaborative meta-analysis. Human Reproduction Update, Jun;19 (3): 221-31. doi: 10.1093/humupd/dms050.
  4. Moslemi MK, Tavanbakhsh S. Selenium–vitamin E supplementation in infertile men: effects on semen parameters and pregnancy rate. International Journal of General Medicine. 2011;4:99-104. doi:10.2147/IJGM.S16275.
  5. Akmal M, Qadri JQ, Al-Waili NS, Thangal S, Haq A, Saloom KY. Improvement in human semen quality after oral supplementation of vitamin C. J Med Food. 2006 Fall;9(3):440-2. Accessed 12/27/16 from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17004914
  6. Moriyama H, Nakamura K, Sanda N, Fujiwara E, Seko S, Yamazaki A, Mizutani M, Sagami K, Kitano T, [Studies on the usefulness of a long-term, high-dose treatment of methylcobalamin in patients with oligozoospermia]. Hinyokika Kiyo. 1987 Jan;33(1):151-6. Accessed 12/27/16 from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3107356
  7. Watanabe T, Ohkawa K, Kasai S, Ebara S, Nakano Y, Watanabe Y. The effects of dietary vitamin B12 deficiency on sperm maturation in developing and growing male rats. Congenit Anom (Kyoto). 2003 Mar;43(1):57-64. Accessed 12/27/16 from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12692404
Source: http://www.marketwired.com/press-release/research-reveals-the-importance-of-nutrition-for-fathers-to-be-2185988.htm

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Show us your SPRING Clean!

Springtime is synonymous with beauty, flowers, and renewal. I associate those things with cleaning because I find beauty in clean things and typically decorate my home with fresh flowers after I organize a have everything sparkling. While it might be tempting to spray your whole place with bleach or disinfectant spray (that make things “clean,” right?), a lot of common household cleaning products are actually pretty toxic to our health. Luckily, there are ways to keep things fresh and sanitary. Read on for the low-down when selecting better and safer products for you, your family and your home.

The Environmental Protection Agency ranks indoor air pollution among the top environmental dangers, and much of this pollution comes from common cleaning products (or what we’ll call “indoor pollutants”). Immediate effects of exposure to indoor pollutants can include headaches, foggy thinking, dizziness, fatigue, and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, as well as exacerbated symptoms of asthma and other respiratory illnesses. Long-term effects (following long or repeated exposure to indoor pollutants) include respiratory diseases, autism spectrum disorder, heart disease, learning disabilities, ADHD, cancer, infertility, hormonal imbalances, chronic fatigue, obesity, early puberty, immune system diseases and even cancer. Small particles of dust and toxins can infest your home. Be sure to stay informed about your house and learn about any contaminants that could affect your health. For example, asbestos is a mineral that was used in housing materials. Left alone, it is harmless, but damaged it could pose a serious health concern such as mesothelioma cancer. The indoor pollutants that can cause these reactions are so common that the EPA strongly recommends everyone improve the air quality of their home, regardless of whether symptoms are currently present. (See tips throughout infographic).

Be sure to change your air filter on the recommended schedule to reduce pet dander, dust, and other pollutants from circulating through your home. While cleaning may be more economical than replacing the shower liner in your home, if it is old, you may just need to replace it. Look carefully at the materials the new liner is made of so that you do not bring more hazardous chemicals to your home.  Beware of PVC-containing shower curtains which can emit 108 chemicals in the air according to studies by the Center for Health, Environment and Justice, CHEJ. Avoid their cousins made from PEVA or EVA, though less harmful, recent studies have proven them to be harmful nonetheless. Other PVC based products such as flooring can create further issues, so it considering a remodel be sure to consult an expert. Especially if your home was built prior to 1970, as it can contain asbestos. If you are still inclined to be a DIYer, be sure to wear protective masks, gloves and ventilate your home.

For those of us who do not want to spend money on an air purifier, NASA has provided us with great insight to plants, such as:

  • Garden Mum
  • Spider Plant
  • Dracaena
  • Ficus/Weeping Fig
  • Peace Lily
  • Boston Fern
  • Snake Plant
  • Bamboo Palm
  • Aloe Vera

All of whom will purify the air of the following pollutants, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene and xylene. (Thanks to the greatist.com for this fantastic list!)

Don’t rely on the government to protect you when it comes to hazardous chemicals in cleaning products, DO YOUR RESEARCH! They don’t regulate or assess the safety (or even labeling) of the vast majority of cleaning products on the market. The EPA, meanwhile, only regulates cleaners that contain registered pesticides. This means that consumers are basically on their own when it comes to choosing safe cleaning products — a task that’s way easier said than done. (For reviews of the toxicity of household cleaners and even personal care products, check out the Environmental Working Group’s database at www.EWG.com).

Here are some facts about cleaning and cleaners that you may not be aware of:

  • There are over 80,000 chemicals in use in the US alone, over 11,000 of which are banned overseas.
  • Manufacturers of cleaning products and laundry detergents we use every day (unlike food, beverage and other personal care products) are not regulated by federal law to list their ingredients.
  • It takes approximately 26 seconds for any substance to be absorbed through your skin and enter your bloodstream or inhaled and entered into your lungs.
  • We are the first generation ever exposed to an unprecedented amount of toxic chemicals on a daily basis, a number which is on the rise.
  • Luckily, chemical-laden cleaning products aren’t the only means to keep a home sparkly. Before you purchase anything, arm yourself with information and research on the products you currently use.

Beware of the words Non-Toxic vs Toxic-Free, they mean two different things. While we may use them interchangeably, there is no regulation regarding the Non-Toxic term, even after passing the cut off where something could be considered Non-Toxic does not make it safe. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, who created The Federal Hazardous Substance Act, deems a product toxic if it can produce personal injury or illness to humans when it is inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through the skin. In other words, if a substance kills ONLY 49% of the test subjects, could be legally labeled non-toxic. Makes you feel really safe, right? However, Toxic-Free cannot produce any reaction or harm their subjects in any way shape or form. The solution is to minimize what you can control and prevent exposure in the first place. The first place to start is in your home.

If you are looking for the best of the best, be on the lookout for products that have the Certified Toxic Free seal, like the ones found at www.MyToxicFreeClub.com, next look for EcoCert, Certified Organic, and USDA Certified Biobased. These certifications will insure that the products were produced by conscientious companies and guarantee that all ingredients have been researched, tested and do not cause negative health effects. A lot of us have made homemade cleaning products at some point thinking they are better for us or that they can help save us money and protect the environment; this may not necessarily be true. Research the ingredients first and make sure you will not end up with a worse product in comparison to a store-bought one.

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If you are still unsure of how to get started down the path to a healthier toxic-free lifestyle this spring season, feel free to drop me an email at dnp1515@gmail.com and I will answer your more specific questions. Thank you to the Mesothelioma Asbestos Awareness Center for this amazing infographic.

Happy Spring Cleaning!

Perla Middleton
*I was not compensated by maacenter.org for writing this article, however they gave me the rights to utilize this amazing infographic.

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Let’s not forget our tweens/teens…

When thinking of products that are safe for the family most often we immediately think of babies and toddlers, but we often forget that our tweens/teens have needs and are at risk from not only ingredients in products that are made for younger audiences but those they experiment with that are made for adult ones too. Below is a prime example of a perfectly beautiful face made up (obviously for a photo shoot), but nowadays not far from what teens are starting to look like every day. Alarming to say the least.

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Here are some tips for teens and tweens from The Environmental Working Group (EWG):

Teens use cosmetics. Sometimes lots of them. From hair gels and straighteners to eye makeup, body wash and lotions. And then some! Knowing which ones are healthy — and which ones aren’t — is important. Why? EWG found that adolescent girls’ bodies are contaminated with chemicals commonly used in cosmetics and body care products. In fact, we detected 16 potentially toxic chemicals — phthalates, triclosan, parabens, and musks — in blood and urine samples from 20 teen girls. Studies link these chemicals to potential health effects including cancer and hormone disruption. (Then we wonder why our girls are reaching puberty sometimes at the tender age of 8-9).

To make matters worse, teens may be particularly sensitive to exposures to hormone-disrupting chemicals, given the complex role they play during puberty – precisely when girls typically experiment with an increasing number and variety of body care products. When we surveyed them, our teen study participants reported using an average of 17 personal care products each day, 40 percent more than an adult woman.

Teens can easily make safer choices by reducing the number of body care products they use, viewing marketing claims with skepticism, always checking the ingredients for toxins (a good lifelong habit!), and following EWG guidelines to select safer products:

Acne products Avoid:

  • Triclosan
  • Parabens
  • PEG/cetearetj/polyethylene

 

Perfume, cologne, and body spray Avoid:

  • Diethyl phthalate
  • “Fragrance” (listed as an ingredients

 

Make-up Avoid:

  • Loose powders
  • Vitamin A (listed as: retinol, retinyl palmitate, retinyl acetate) in skin and lip products

Choose:

Safer make-up using Skin Deep.  Sun protection Be sun smart! Sunburns in children and teens increase your risk of the most deadly form of skin cancer–melanoma.  Avoid tanning beds. Tanning booths expose the skin to 15 times more UV sun. The use of tanning beds before age 30 can cause a 75 percent increase in melanoma.

 

Unsure of what you are bringing into your home and how it compares to some safer alternatives?  Download the SkinDeep App to your iPhone or Android and scan or type products you currently use and see how they rate and then click on the link that says look for safer alternatives.

You can always shop at MyToxicFreeClub.com for organic, ToxicFree, cruelty-free, vegan and amazingly safe products.  You can even save 30% instantly on every purchase by joining the rewards program (not even the stand-alone chains do that… they give you points towards a coupon).  And even get an extra 10% by referring your friends.

Beyond Natural Perla

Site goes live January 4th.

All these resources are free of charge and are available to your benefit.  I know that there is at least, one of these things your tween or the tween of someone you know who is struggling with one of these issues.

ps. if you are looking for an amazing line of natural, toxic-free, organic, vegan makeup made in the USA… email me.  I know just the one that is in soft launch right now and is flying off the virtual shelves.

Feel free to contact me anytime.

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Be in the know- GoBeyond Natural

blog-headerfragrance

Did you know when the term “fragrance” is listed on a product label it can indicate the presence of up to 4,000 separate ingredients, including many that are toxic, carcinogenic or endocrine disruptors? Fragrance crafters use more than 5,000 different ingredients, but only about 1,300 of those ingredients have actually been tested and evaluated for safety.

Meanwhile, clinical observations have proven that fragrances can negatively affect the central nervous system, and reports to the FDA add headaches, dizziness, rashes, skin discoloration, violent coughing, vomiting and allergic skin reactions to the list of potential health risks posed by the chemicals used in fragrances.

The European Union takes a strict stance on the use of many fragrance ingredients, restricting the use of certain known toxic ingredients such as nitromusks, and requiring warning labels on products that contain known allergens. However, according to U.S. regulatory bodies, fragrance formulations are considered “trade secrets,” so their disclosure is not required on product labels, and the industry is largely self-regulated.nitromusks, and requiring warning labels on products that contain known allergens. However, according to U.S. regulatory bodies, fragrance formulations are considered “trade secrets,” so their disclosure is not required on product labels, and the industry is largely self-regulated.

Fragrances pollute the air to a greater extent than smoke from tobacco users, because the use of scented products is much more common. Just think about it. How many of the products you use every day contain a fragrance?

Skin Care (Lotions, Scrubs, Serums)
Body Care (Soaps, Deodorants, Sunscreens, Bug Sprays)
Hair Care (Shampoos, Conditioners and Styling Products)
Household (Dish Soap, Window Cleaner, Detergents & Furniture Polish)
While it may seem easy to ditch your perfume/cologne and thereby escape the problem, the reality is not so simple, especially when you factor in the fact that you’re also dealing with second-hand fragrances from other people, too.

Although avoiding toxic fragrances can seem a bit challenging, there are a couple of ways to minimize your exposure:

Fragrance-free products. Due to the natural sensitivity of a growing segment of the population, a larger number of fragrance-free products have hit the market.
Toxic-Free Alternatives. Find products that use safe fragrances 100% naturally derived from botanical ingredients such as flowers, fruits, bark, seeds, leaves and other natural, raw materials. Essential oils may not pack the punch of their synthetic rivals, but we think that’s a good thing.

To find out more to visit Go Beyond Natural and click on Be in the Know and read customer stories, read their Blog and other educational materials.

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It’s going to be BRIG! Join us Thursday, August 7th at 9pm EST

we invite you to the brig heart call

Brig Hart, newly unveiled owner and founder of The Healthy Home Company will be joining our next Healthy Home Company corporate call, which takes place this Thursday, August 7th at 9PM ET / 6PM PT! You’ll have the opportunity to hear from Brig and the rest of our corporate team, learn more about his exciting announcement, the Big Event and much more! Invite your family, friends, loved ones—you don’t want to miss this call!

At the end of the call circle back around with us and share your thoughts, we would love to hear from you!!

www.MyToxicFreeClub.com

Perla

Perla Middleton
Founding Member
Healthy Home Company

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Are you surviving or thriving in today’s toxic world?

Attend this FREE virtual Detox Summit! The Lineup and topics are INCREDIBLE!

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As a Founding Member of a company that sells certified Toxic Free Products, I like to stay abreast of what is going so I can better inform those around me of the latest in #toxic trends, so I signed up for this virtual summit- it is free, so if you are interested and have free time this week to watch the presentations, it should be really informative!

Environmental toxins can be found in what you eat, drink, breathe, feel and think. You may not be aware of toxins, but if you want to be healthy, being educated on the latest in toxins is a must! Chronic conditions, like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity, may be associated with environmental toxins in your body.

The pearls of wisdom from expert speakers at The Detox Summit are essential to your health. Join us online for free from August 4-11.

This Detox Summit will provide you with the information you need to:

  •     Learn about environmental toxins in food, air and water
  •     Understand internally-generated toxins, like thoughts, emotions and behaviors
  •     Recognize toxins of all types and eliminate them
  •     Focus on breakthrough solutions to gain more energy and vitality

Navigate your way through today’s toxic terrain when you register for the free, online Detox Summit today:

“Detox” is a multi-faceted term that means many things to people, from drug and alcohol detoxification to nutritional detoxification, or cleanses using food, smoothies and juices. Deanna Minich, PhD, has selected 30 experts in various areas of medicine, nutrition and personal growth to offer a well-rounded, credible approach to the issues of environmental toxins and holistic health.

Here are a few of the incredible presenters:

Jeffrey Bland, PhD, Father of Functional Medicine

The Science of Nutritional Detoxification

Mark Hyman, MD, Functional Medicine Expert

Toxins and Chronic Disease: Why Detox is a Necessity for Good Health

Jeffrey Smith, Leading Spokesperson on GMOs

Genetically Modified Foods as Toxins in Everyday Eating

David Wolfe, Superfoods Guru

Foods to Enhance Vitality and Detox

Rainbeau Mars, Fitness Model and Actress

A Full Spectrum, Superstar Approach to Everyday Detox

With 30 presenters sharing their wealth of knowledge, this invaluable (and FREE) resource is intended for people everywhere!

Better yet, if you register today you’ll have access to the following FREE eBooks as soon as you register!

 Food & Spirit Nourish Your Whole Self™ Report, by Deanna Minich, PhD

  • Detox Your Medicine Cabinet: 26 Herbs and Supplements that Treat Common Symptoms, by Aviva Romm, MD
  • Top 7 Therapeutic Foods, by Kelly Brogan, MD
  • Ten Tips for Helping Your Loved One with Autism, by Martha Herbert, MD, PhD
  • Benefits of Vitamin D, by Soram Khalsa, MD

Come listen to The Detox Summit ONLINE for FREE from August 4-11, and learn to survive your toxic world! Check out this line up!

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I’ll see you at the Summit!  

PS. If you cannot make it to some of the webinars and you really want to watch, follow this link to find out how to get access after the fact.

Perla

Perla Middleton
Founding Member
Healthy Home Company

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Myths on Cosmetic Safety

Myth – If it’s for sale at a supermarket, drugstore or department store cosmetics counter, it must be safe.

Fact –  The Food and Drug Administration has no authority to require companies to test cosmetics products for safety. The agency does not review or approve the vast majority of products or ingredients before they go on the market. FDA conducts pre-market reviews only of certain cosmetics color additives and active ingredients that are classified as over-the-counter drugs (FDA 2005, 2010).

Myth – The government prohibits the use of all dangerous chemicals in personal care products, and companies wouldn’t risk using them.

Fact – With the exception of color additives and a few prohibited substances, cosmetics companies may use any ingredient or raw material in their products without government review or approval (FDA 2005). Whereas the European Union has banned more than 1,000 ingredients from use in cosmetics, the FDA has only prohibited the following (FDA 2000a):

  • Bithionol
  • Chlorofluorocarbon propellants
  • Chloroform
  • Halogenated salicylanilides (di-, tri-, metabromsalan and tetrachlorosalicylanilide)
  • Methylene chloride
  • Vinyl chloride
  • Zirconium-containing complexes
  • Prohibited cattle materials (including material from non-ambulatory cattle, material from cattle not inspected and passed and mechanically separated beef).

Myth – The cosmetics industry effectively polices itself, making sure that all ingredients meet a strict standard of safety.

Fact – Since FDA does little to regulate ingredient safety, it has authorized the cosmetics industry to police itself through its Cosmetics Ingredient Review panel. In its more than 30-year history, the industry panel has declared only 11 ingredients or chemical groups to be unsafe (CIR 2012). Its recommendations on restricting ingredients are not binding on companies (FDA 2012).

Myth – Cosmetic ingredients are applied to the skin and rarely get into the body. When they do, the amounts are too low to matter.

Fact – People are exposed to cosmetics ingredients in many ways: breathing in sprays and powders, swallowing chemicals on the lips or hands or absorbing them through the skin. Biomonitoring studies have found that cosmetics ingredients – such as phthalate plasticizers, paraben preservatives, the pesticide triclosan, synthetic musks and sunscreen ingredients – are common pollutants in the bodies of men, women and children. Many of these chemicals are potential hormone disruptors (Gray 1986, Schreurs 2004, Gomez 2005, Veldhoen 2006). Cosmetics frequently contain enhancers that allow ingredients to penetrate deeper into the skin. Studies have found health problems in people exposed to common fragrance and sunscreen ingredients, including increased risk of sperm damage, feminization of the male reproductive system and low birth weight in girls (Duty 2003, Hauser 2007, Swan 2005, Wolff 2008).

Myth – Products made for children or bearing claims like “hypoallergenic” are safer choices.

Fact – Most cosmetic marketing claims are unregulated, and companies are rarely, if ever, required to back them up, even for children’s products. The FDA says descriptions such as “hypoallergenic” or “natural” can “mean anything or nothing at all,” and while most of these terms “have considerable market value in promoting cosmetic products to consumers… dermatologists say they have very little medical meaning” (FDA 2000b).

Myth – Natural and organic products are always safer.

Fact – Products labeled natural or organic often contain synthetic chemicals, and even truly natural or organic ingredients are not necessarily risk-free. The global market for organic personal care products was valued at more than $7 billion in 2012, capturing the attention of consumers who prefer more natural or plant-based products (Cosmetics Design 2013). Products labeled “organic” or “natural” can contain petrochemicals, and those certified as organic can contain as little as 10 percent organic ingredients by weight or volume (Certech 2008). FDA tried to establish an official definition for the term “natural,” but this initiative was overturned in court (FDA 1998).

Myth – FDA promptly recalls any product that injures people.

Fact – FDA has no authority to require recalls of harmful cosmetics. Furthermore, manufacturers are not required to report cosmetics-related injuries to the agency. FDA relies on companies to report injuries voluntarily (FDA 2005).

Myth – Consumers can read ingredient labels and avoid products with hazardous chemicals.

Fact – Federal law allows companies to leave some chemical ingredients off their product labels, including those considered to be trade secrets, components of fragrance and nanomaterials (FDA 2011). Fragrance may include any number of the industry’s 3,100 stock chemicals (IFRA 2010), none of which is required to be listed on labels. Tests of fragrance ingredients have found an average of 14 hidden compounds per formulation, including ingredients linked to hormone disruption and sperm damage (EWG & CSC 2010).

Myth – Cosmetics safety is a concern for women only.

Fact – An EWG 2004 consumer survey showed that while on average women use 12 personal care products daily, men use an average of six a day, exposing themselves to more than 80 unique ingredients.

References

Certech Registration Inc. 2008. International organic standard – Natural and natural organic cosmetic certification. IOS Cosmetics. Issue 01. April 2008. http://www.certechregistration.com/IOS_cosmetics_standard.pdf.

CIR (Cosmetic Ingredient Review). 2012. Ingredients found unsafe for use in cosmetics (11 total, through February 2012). http://www.cir-safety.org/sites/default/files/U-unsafe%202-02-2012%20final.pdf, last viewed November 2013.

Cosmetics Design. 2013. Global market for organic personal care expected to continue rapid growth. July 9, 2013. http://www.cosmeticsdesign.com/Market-Trends/Global-market-for-organic-personal-care-expected-to-continue-rapid-growth

Duty SM, Singh NP, Silva MJ, Barr DB, Brock JW, Ryan L, et al. 2003. The Relationship between Environmental Exposures to Phthalates and DNA Damage in Human Sperm Using the Neutral Comet Assay. Environmental Health Perspectives 111(9): 1164-9.

EWG & CSC (Environmental Working Group and Campaign for Safe Cosmetics). 2010. Not so sexy. Hidden chemicals in perfume and cologne. http://www.safecosmetics.org/article.php?id=644

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 1998. Clearing Up Cosmetic Confusion” by Carol Lewis. FDA Consumer magazine. May-June 1998. http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/health/cosmetic-confusion/398_cosm.html.

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2000a. Ingredients prohibited & restricted by FDA regulations. June 22, 1996; Updated May 30, 2000. http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/ProductandIngredientSafety/SelectedCosmeticIngredients/ucm127406.htm.

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2000b. Hypoallergenic Cosmetics. http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/cosmeticlabelinglabelclaims/labelclaimsandexpirationdating/ucm2005203.htm.

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2005. FDA authority over cosmetics. http://www.fda.gov/Cosmetics/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/ucm074162.htm

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2010. Regulation of non-prescription products. http://www.fda.gov/AboutFDA/CentersOffices/OfficeofMedicalProductsandTobacco/CDER/ucm093452.htm

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2011. Guidance for Industry: Considering Whether an FDA Regulated Product Involves the Application of Nanotechnology (Draft Guidance). http://www.fda.gov/RegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm257698.htm

FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2012. How FDA Evaluated Regulated Products: Cosmetics. Last updated April 4, 2012.

Gomez E, Pillon A, Fenet H, Rosain D, Duchesne MJ, Nicolas JC, et al. 2005. Estrogenic activity of cosmetic components in reporter cell lines: parabens, UV screens, and musks. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 68(4): 239-251.

Gray TJ, Gangolli SD. 1986. Aspects of the testicular toxicity of phthalate esters. Environmental Health Perspectives 65: 229-23.

Hauser R, et al. 2007. DNA damage in human sperm is related to urinary levels of phthalate monoester and oxidative metabolites. Human Reproduction.22(3):688-95.

IFRA (International Fragrance Association). 2010. Ingredients. IFRA survey: Transparency list. http://www.ifraorg.org/public/index_ps/parentid/1/childid/15/leafid/111.

Schreurs RH, Legler J, Artola-Garicano E, Sinnige TL, Lanser PH, Seinen W, et al. 2004. In vitro and in vivo antiestrogenic effects of polycyclic musks in zebrafish. Environmental Science & Technology 38(4): 997-1002.

Swan SH, Main KM, Liu F, Stewart SL, Kruse RL, Calafat AM, et al. 2005. Decrease in anogenital distance among male infants with prenatal phthalate exposure. Environmental Health Perspectives113(8):1056-61.

Veldhoen N, Skirrow RC, Osachoff H, Wigmore H, Clapson DJ, Gunderson MP, et al. 2006. The bactericidal agent triclosan modulates thyroid hormone-associated gene expression and disrupts postembryonic anuran development. Aquatic toxicology (Amsterdam, Netherlands) 80(3): 217-227.

Wolff MS, Engel SM, Berkowitz GS, Ye X, Silva MJ, Zhu C, Wetmur J, Calafat AM. 2008. Prenatal phenol and phthalate exposures and birth outcomes. Environmental Health Perspectives. Aug;116(8):1092-7.

Wu X, Bennett DH, Ritz B. 2010. Usage pattern of personal care products in California households. Food and Chemical Toxicology 48: 3109–3119

For safe cosmetics feel free to drop by www.MyToxicFreeClub.com

Perla

Perla Middleton
Founding Member
Healthy Home Company

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